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❶A well-written introduction lets your reader know what you are going to be writing about.

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What Is the College Essay Introduction For?

Start your introduction with a sentence that gets the reader interested in the topic. To pique the reader's interest, you can begin with a quote, a personal story, a surprising statistic or an interesting question.

For example, if you are arguing that smoking should be banned from all public places, you can start your introduction by referencing a statistic from a verified source: Providing readers with background on the topic allows them to better understand the issue being presented. This information provides context and history that can be crucial to explaining and arguing your point. For example, if you are arguing that there should never be a military draft in the United States, your introduction can include information about the history of the U.

The thesis is the essence of an argumentative essay. In a single, clear sentence, it sums up what point you are trying to make. You then pivot to an explanation of why this story is an accurate illustration of one of your core qualities, values, or beliefs. The story typically comes in the first half of the essay, and the insightful explanation comes second —but, of course, all rules were made to be broken, and some great essays flip this more traditional order.

What are the ingredients of a great personal statement introduction? You've got your reader's attention when you see its furry ears extended … No, wait. You've got your squirrel's attention. Want to write the perfect college application essay? Get professional help from PrepScholar. Your dedicated PrepScholar Admissions counselor will craft your perfect college essay, from the ground up. We'll learn your background and interests, brainstorm essay topics, and walk you through the essay drafting process, step-by-step.

At the end, you'll have a unique essay that you'll proudly submit to your top choice colleges. Don't leave your college application to chance. Find out more about PrepScholar Admissions now: So my suggestion is to work in reverse order! In the next sections of this article, I'll talk about how to work backwards on the introduction, moving from bigger to smaller elements: Don't get too excited about working in reverse—not all activities are safe to do backwards.

Once you've figured out your topic and zeroed in on the experience you want to highlight in the beginning of your essay, here are 2 great approaches to making it into a story:.

Later, as you listen to the recorded story to try to get a sense of how to write it, you can also get a sense of the tone with which you want to tell your story. Are you being funny as you talk? Trying to shock, surprise, or astound your audience? The way you most naturally tell your story is the way you should write it.

After you've done this storyteller exercise, write down the salient points of what you learned. What is the story your essay will tell? What is the point about your life, point of view, or personality it will make?

What tone will you tell it with? Sketch out a detailed outline so that you can start filling in the pieces as we work through how to write the introductory sections. The former builds expectations and evokes curiosity, and the latter stimulates the imagination and creates a connection with the author.

In both cases, you hit your goal of greater reader engagement. The experience of coming out is raw and emotional, and the issue of LGBTQ rights is an important facet of modern life. This three-word sentence immediately sums up an enormous background of the personal and political.

Wolf, my fourth-grade band teacher, as he lifted the heavy tuba and put it into my arms. This sentence conjures up a funny image—we can immediately picture the larger adult standing next to a little kid holding a giant tuba.

It also does a little play on words: I live alone—I always have since elementary school. Kevin Zevallos '16 for Connecticut College. This opener definitely makes us want to know more.

Why was he alone? Where were the protective grown-ups who surround most kids? How on earth could a little kid of years old survive on his own? I have old hands. What are "old" hands? How has having these hands affected the author? There was no possibility of taking a walk that day.

Charlotte Bronte, Jane Eyre. Who wanted to go for a walk? And why was this person being prevented from going? Look at how much specificity this sentence packs in less than 20 words. Each noun and adjective is chosen for its ability to convey yet another detail. Maybe it's because I live in Rhinelander, Wisconsin, where Brett Favre draws more of a crowd on Sunday than any religious service, cheese is a staple food, it's sub-zero during global warming, current "fashions" come three years after they've hit it big with the rest of the world, and where all children by the age of ten can use a gauge like it's their job.

Riley Smith '12 for Hamilton College. This sentence manages to hit every stereotype about Wisconsin held by outsiders—football, cheese, polar winters, backwardness, and guns—and this piling on gives us a good sense of place while also creating enough hyperbole to be funny.

At the same time, the sentence raises the tantalizing question: High, high above the North Pole, on the first day of , two professors of English Literature approached each other at a combined velocity of miles per hour.

David Lodge, Changing Places. To avoid falling into generalities with this one, make sure you're really creating an argument or debate with your counterintuitive sentence. If string theory is really true, then the entire world is made up of strings, and I cannot tie a single one. This sentence hints that the rest of the essay will continue playing with linked, albeit not typically connected, concepts.

In just six words, this sentence upends everything we think we know about what happens to human beings. Is this person about to declare herself to be totally selfish and uncaring about the less fortunate?

We want to know the story that would lead someone to this kind of conclusion. So many amazing details here. Why is the Colonel being executed? What does "discovering" ice entail? How does he go from ice-discoverer to military commander of some sort to someone condemned to capital punishment? To work well, your question should be especially specific, come out of left field, or pose a surprising hypothetical.

How does an agnostic Jew living in the Diaspora connect to Israel? This is a thorny opening, raising questions about the difference between being an ethnic Jew and practicing the religion of Judaism, and the obligations of Jews who live outside of Israel to those who live in Israel and vice versa.

There's a lot of meat to this question, setting up a philosophically interesting, politically important, and personally meaningful essay. While traveling through the daily path of life, have you ever stumbled upon a hidden pocket of the universe? The lesson you learned should be slightly surprising not necessarily intuitive and something that someone else might disagree with.

Perhaps it wasn't wise to chew and swallow a handful of sand the day I was given my first sandbox, but it seemed like a good idea at the time. The reader wants to know more. All happy families are alike; each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way. Establish your topic by using a clear, concise statement. This statement is the main idea for your text. Generally, you write a single sentence to establish your main idea or ideas, and it is the most specific part of your introduction. This sentence should go at the end of your introductory paragraph.

Include your main points to give your readers guidance. Part of establishing your argument is giving your readers a preview of what's to come. Establish guideposts, which are specific phrases or sentences that tell the reader exactly what you plan to cover in your text.

That way, your reader knows to look for those topics as they read your paper. In some cases, you might choose not to introduce your main points in the introduction. As long as you explain them in the body of your paper and they relate back to your thesis, this is fine.

Place your main ideas at the end of your introduction. By convention, your main ideas statement provides the transition between your introduction and the rest of your text. Therefore, it goes right before you begin the body of your text. However, if you need to do so, you can include a transition sentence to help your reader understand that you're moving onward.

Use original phrasing to make your introduction more interesting. It's tempting to use cliches or overused expressions in an introduction, especially if you don't really know what to say. However, you'll start out your essay by boring your reader, which is not a great place to begin.

Similarly, skip formulaic introductions, such as "This essay is about Ensure your introduction is appropriate for the style of text. A very informal introduction is generally not appropriate for an academic essay, particularly a scientific one.

On the other hand, a stiff, formal introduction usually doesn't work well in a blog post. As you write your introduction, think about whether it's an appropriate style. Revisit your introduction after you've finished the text to see if it fits. It's perfectly normal to write your introduction before the rest of your text. However, your argument may change over the course of writing.

Therefore, you should give your introduction a read-through to make sure it still introduces the text well. Check the points you mentioned in your introduction that you planned on bringing up in your paper. Did you hit them all? Write your introduction after the body to make it easier to compose. Sometimes, when you're beginning your text, you may not know exactly all the points you want to make.

Plus, if you're like many people, you may find the introduction the hardest part to write. If that's the case, coming back to it later can get you going on the text. Not Helpful 8 Helpful 5. Where can I find a sample essay that identifies the thesis statement, supporting paragraphs, concluding paragraphs, and introduction? If you search for "sample essay with parts labeled" on Google, you should be able to find some sample essays or at least portions of essays with each part of the essay highlighted.

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A killer opening line and catchy introduction are exactly what you want for your essay. You want to write an essay introduction that says, “READ ME! To learn how to write an essay introduction in 3 easy steps, keep reading!

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In academic settings, ideas are typically communicated using formal types of writing such as essays. Most academic essays contain an introductory paragraph, which includes a thesis. How to Write a Good Introduction. Posted on March 31, Perhaps an anecdote about that time your friend read Moby Dick and hated it is not the best way.

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Write the Introduction and Conclusion. Your essay lacks only two paragraphs now: the introduction and the conclusion. or briefly describe your feelings about the topic. Even an anecdote can end your essay in a useful way. The introduction and conclusion complete the paragraphs of your essay. Don't stop just yet! One more step remains . A good introduction in an argumentative essay acts like a good opening statement in a trial. Just like a lawyer, a writer must present the issue at hand, give background, and put forth the main argument -- all in a logical, intellectual and persuasive way.

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How to Start a College Essay Perfectly. Posted by Dr. Anna Wulick | May 4, How to Write a College Essay Introduction. and it's a great way to keep readers updated on where they are in the flow of the essay and your argument. Here are three ways to do this, with real-life examples from college essays published by colleges. The Simplest Way to Write an Essay By creating an essay outline and gathering all the information before writing the actual essay, the essay essentially writes itself. .