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Jarhead (Marine Corps) Jargon

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Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free! Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way. You might've seen this one before. Paraphrasing in a cut-and-paste world. Some of our favourite British words. The story of an imaginary word that managed to sneak past our editors and enter the dictionary. How we chose 'feminism'. How to use a word that literally drives some people nuts.

The awkward case of 'his or her'. Test your knowledge - and maybe learn something along the way. Build a city of skyscrapers—one synonym at a time. So American's started calling Koreans "Gooks". The term then was brought to Vietnam to include Vietnamese as well. It has nothing to do with civilians. Any Vietnamese was considered a Gook.

Since then it has expanded to all Asians though of course it is considered a derogatory term. Jarhead - Another name for a Marine John Wayne - A grandstander, or descriptive of a bold act, or any act which is typical in the movies but not sound Marine procedure, such as firing a machine gun from the hip. Also, a simple can opener that can be carried on the dogtag chain.

LPC's - Leather personnel carriers Given this name for the job that some saliors must do pick rust off ships. JARHEAD Regarding the term Jarhead, all are well aware of the explanations for the origins for this name for Marines--that it found its origins in the high, dress blues, collar of the Marine uniform, that it refers to the similarity to a Mason jar, the "high and tight" haircut of Marines, and that the term was first used for Marines by members of the U.

The following, my own information, from my own experiences and opinions only are presented here for your perusal. All this may be, and may well have become later additions to these stories, we don't know for sure with absolute accuracy how these things really come to be.

So there is always some room for question, doubt, and opinions contrary to the prevailing explanations. When I was a brand new, young PFC in , first reporting to Marine Barracks, Camp Pendleton, Oceanside, California no zip code after graduating boot camp, yes, that's how my orders were worded I was soon to learn of a different origin for the term Jarhead.

On one or two occasions I was overheard discussing Marine Corps lore with other boots, and corrected by one or more of the old salts. In particular, I was told that the term Jarhead originated in the Corps back in the days when mules were still used.

As anyone who has ever watched an old western movie knows, mules were often referred to as Jughead. Over time, certain stubborn or hard to deal with Marines were also called Jarheads. While we're at it here, here's some more information--food for thought--on the same topic. This one was posted to one of the GyG messageboards, and at least it does provide a reference for its remarks.

Strong, hearty, and persevering, the mule is truly an appropriate symbol for the Corps of Cadets. Jarhead and jughead eventually merged to become slang synonyms for marine. In addition to the above ideas, here are a few more: Perhaps from the shape of the hat the Marines once wore. American Heritage Dictionary of English A slang term used by sailors as early as World War II to refer to members of the Marine Corps, drawing the term from the resemblance of the Marine dress blues uniform, with its high collar, to a Mason jar which at the time was made from blue glass.

Army origin, some say Marines.

JARHEAD Defined for English Language Learners

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The term "jarhead" comes from the shape of the Old Corps covers (hats) that were worn by Marines. The poster is assuming that it is derrogatory, but in fact Marines call each other jarhead as a matter of course.

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May 27,  · In the s, the term jarhead was well established, while the term "high and tight" did not yet exist. Marines who chose to trim their hair closely on the sides were said to have "white sidewalls." Photos of Marines in the World War II era show haircuts that are even lossweightcbrqz.gq: Resolved.

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Recent Examples of jarhead from the Web When jarhead coders wrote their own version of Doom II, putting players in landscapes that resembled the Iraqi desert and other likely theaters of battle, Vaughn played it day and night. Instead of being insulted, the Marines loved it. The term became common by World War I and has been extensively used since that time. Jarhead: For roughly 50 years, sailors had little luck in their effort to insult Marines by calling them Gyrenes. So, during World War .

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JARHEAD Regarding the term Jarhead, all are well aware of the explanations for the origins for this name for Marines--that it found its origins in the high, dress blues, collar of the Marine uniform, that it refers to the similarity to a Mason jar, the "high and tight" haircut of Marines, and that the term was first used for Marines by members of the U.S. Navy, etc. The screenplay is by Bill Broyles, the writer responsible for Jarhead, Cast Away, and Apollo