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Virginia Woolf

by Virginia Woolf

❶Eling Bishop — []. Is it not the task of the novelist to convey this varying, this unknown and uncircumscribed spirit, whatever aberration or com- plexity it may display, with as little mixture of the alien and external as possible?

Mrs Dalloway by Virginia Woolf

Early fiction
Stream of Consciousness
A Dreamy Stream

While she is best known for her novels, especially Mrs. A fine stylist, she experimented with several forms of biographical writing, composed painterly short fictions, and sent to her friends and family a lifetime of brilliant letters. Born Virginia Stephen, she was the child of ideal Victorian parents.

Her father, Leslie Stephen , was an eminent literary figure and the first editor —91 of the Dictionary of National Biography. Her mother, Julia Jackson, possessed great beauty and a reputation for saintly self-sacrifice; she also had prominent social and artistic connections, which included Julia Margaret Cameron , her aunt and one of the greatest portrait photographers of the 19th century.

Julia Jackson Duckworth and Leslie Stephen married in , and four children followed: Vanessa born , Thoby born , Virginia born , and Adrian born While these four children banded together against their older half siblings, loyalties shifted among them.

At age nine, she was the genius behind a family newspaper, the Hyde Park Gate News , that often teased Vanessa and Adrian. The Stephen family made summer migrations from their London town house near Kensington Gardens to the rather disheveled Talland House on the rugged Cornwall coast. Her neatly divided, predictable world ended, however, when her mother died in at age Virginia, at 13, ceased writing amusing accounts of family news.

Almost a year passed before she wrote a cheerful letter to her brother Thoby. There the siblings lived independent of their Duckworth half brothers, free to pursue studies, to paint or write, and to entertain. Leonard Woolf dined with them in November , just before sailing to Ceylon now Sri Lanka to become a colonial administrator. Soon the Stephens hosted weekly gatherings of radical young people, including Clive Bell , Lytton Strachey , and John Maynard Keynes , all later to achieve fame as, respectively, an art critic, a biographer, and an economist.

Then, after a family excursion to Greece in , Thoby died of typhoid fever. Virginia grieved but did not slip into depression. While writing anonymous reviews for the Times Literary Supplement and other journals, she experimented with such a novel, which she called Melymbrosia. As Clive Bell was unfaithful, Vanessa began an affair with Fry, and Fry began a lifelong debate with Virginia about the visual and verbal arts. In the summer of , Leonard Woolf returned from the East. After he resigned from the colonial service, Leonard and Virginia married in August Then he became a political writer and an advocate for peace and justice.

Nevertheless, she completely recast Melymbrosia as The Voyage Out in After an excursion up the Amazon, Rachel contracts a terrible illness that plunges her into delirium and then death.

That indeterminacy, at odds with the certainties of the Victorian era, is echoed in descriptions that distort perception: Publication of The Voyage Out was delayed until early ; then, that April, she sank into a distressed state in which she was often delirious.

She kept the demons of mania and depression mostly at bay for the rest of her life. In the Woolfs bought a printing press and founded the Hogarth Press , named for Hogarth House, their home in the London suburbs. The Woolfs themselves she was the compositor while he worked the press published their own Two Stories in the summer of Since , Virginia had kept sometimes with Vanessa a country house in Sussex , and in Vanessa settled into a Sussex farmhouse called Charleston.

She had ended her affair with Fry to take up with the painter Duncan Grant , who moved to Charleston with Vanessa and her children, Julian and Quentin Bell; a daughter, Angelica, would be born to Vanessa and Grant at the end of Virginia had kept a diary, off and on, since Critics using these distinctions have credited Woolf with evolving a distinctly feminine diary form, one that explores, with perception, honesty, and humour, her own ever-changing, mosaic self.

Proving that she could master the traditional form of the novel before breaking it, she plotted her next novel in two romantic triangles, with its protagonist Katharine in both. In Night and Day , the Leonard-like Ralph learns to value Katharine for herself, not as some superior being. And Katharine overcomes as Virginia had class and familial prejudices to marry the good and intelligent Ralph.

This novel focuses on the very sort of details that Woolf had deleted from The Voyage Out: Woolf was writing nearly a review a week for the Times Literary Supplement in Meanwhile, typesetting having heightened her sense of visual layout, she began a new novel written in blocks to be surrounded by white spaces.

At the beginning of , the Woolfs moved their city residence from the suburbs back to Bloomsbury, where they were less isolated from London society. Soon the aristocratic Vita Sackville-West began to court Virginia, a relationship that would blossom into a lesbian affair. Having already written a story about a Mrs. Dalloway, Woolf thought of a foiling device that would pair that highly sensitive woman with a shell-shocked war victim, a Mr. Dalloway , the boorish doctors presume to understand personality, but its essence evades them.

At the end of the day, Clarissa gives a grand party and Septimus commits suicide. Woolf wished to build on her achievement in Mrs. Dalloway by merging the novelistic and elegiac forms. As a novel, it broke narrative continuity into a tripartite structure.

Ramsay, like Leslie Stephen, sees poetry as didacticism, conversation as winning points, and life as a tally of accomplishments. He uses logic to deflate hopes for a trip to the lighthouse, but he needs sympathy from his wife. She is more attuned to emotions than reason. Woolf describes the progress of weeds, mold, dust, and gusts of wind, but she merely announces such major events as the deaths of Mrs. Ramsay and a son and daughter. Ramsay and the now-teenage children reach the lighthouse and achieve a moment of reconciliation, Lily completes her painting.

To the Lighthouse melds into its structure questions about creativity and the nature and function of art. Woolf solved biographical, historical, and personal dilemmas with the story of Orlando , who lives from Elizabethan times through the entire 18th century; he then becomes female, experiences debilitating gender constraints, and lives into the 20th century. Woolf herself writes in mock-heroic imitation of biographical styles that change over the same period of time.

A Biography exposes the artificiality of both gender and genre prescriptions. However fantastic, Orlando also argues for a novelistic approach to biography. Afterward she was increasingly angered by masculine condescension to female talent. In The Waves , poetic interludes describe the sea and sky from dawn to dusk. Between the interludes, the voices of six named characters appear in sections that move from their childhood to old age. This oneness with all creation was the primal experience Woolf had felt as a child in Cornwall.

In this her most experimental novel, she achieved its poetic equivalent. However, upon completion of a book, Virginia fell into a dangerously dark depression in anticipation of the world's reaction to her work. Despite her personal difficulties, Virginia Woolf's fiction represented a shift in both structure and style.

The world was changing; literature needed to change too, if it was to properly and honestly convey the new realities. Virginia Woolf was born into an intellectually gifted family.

Her father, Sir Leslie Stephen, is the author of the massive Dictionary of National Biography, a sixty-two volume compilation of the lives of important British citizens. Virginia's sister Vanessa was a gifted painter, and her two brothers Thoby and Adrian were intelligent, dynamic University men. Despite this heady environment-and having the key to her father's library-Virginia was not afforded the opportunity to attend school like her brothers.

This wasn't unusual for the time, but it was something Virginia never quite seemed able to forget. Despite becoming perhaps one of the most intelligent writers of the Twentieth Century, Virginia Woolf always thought of herself as ill educated. After her parents' deaths, Virginia and her siblings moved out of their family home in Kensington and into a rather shabby London neighborhood called Bloomsbury, where they enjoyed the intellectual stimulation of socialists, artists and students.

Thoby, who had made a number of extremely interesting friends while at Cambridge, instituted Thursday night get togethers with his old college buddies and other great London minds: Virginia and Vanessa sat in on these conversations, which ranged from Art to philosophy to politics, and soon became a part of the Bloomsbury Group themselves.

As she came into her own, and comfortable in her new environment, Virginia began to write. She first produced short articles and reviews for various London weeklies. She then embarked on her first novel, The Voyage Out, which would consume nearly five years of her life and go through seven drafts. When that book came out to good reviews, she continued producing novels, each one a more daring experiment in language and structure, it seemed, than the last one.

After a botched marriage proposal from Lytton Strachey, and after turning down two other proposals in the meantime, Virginia accepted Leonard Woolf's proposal of marriage, after recovering from a mental breakdown in a country nursing home.

Although she had affairs of the heart with other women like Vita Sackville-West and Violet Dickinson, Virginia remained very much in love with Leonard for her entire life. He was her greatest supporter, half-nursemaid, half-cheerleader. He was also a good novelist in his own right, and a publishing entrepreneur, having founded Hogarth Press with Virginia. Together, they scouted great unknown talents like T.

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Finally, and most notably, Woolf gives us free indirect speech (a.k.a. free indirect discourse). In this style, the narrator doesn’t set up that the person is thinking something, but instead just puts it out there.

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1. Writing Style of Virginia Woolf 2. As one of the most prominent literary figures of the 20thC,she is widely admired for her technical innovations in the novel, most notably her development of narrative subjectivity. —— 《 Virginia Woolf : Her writing of silence in To The Lighthouse 》 CNKI General Introduction 3.

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To the Lighthouse is a Modernist novel, which means (among other things) that it's All. About. Style. In fact, many argue that the actual story of the novel itself takes get put on the backburner in favor the form with which it's told. That's one of the hallmarks of Modernist literature: the typical meat-and-potatoes of plot and character sit in the back . Mar 30,  · Virginia Woolf is an influential author because of her unique style, incorporations of symbolism and use of similes and metaphors in her literature, specifically in Mrs. Dalloway, To the Lighthouse, and The lossweightcbrqz.gq: Resolved.

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Virginia Woolf's Style of Writing Virginia Woolf was a significant figure in London literary society and her most famous works include Mrs. Dalloway, To the Lighthouse, and Orlando. She suffered immensely as a child from losing both her father and mother at an early age, which led to the beginning of her several nervous breakdowns and. Despite her personal difficulties, Virginia Woolf's fiction represented a shift in both structure and style. The world was changing; literature needed to change too, if it was to properly and honestly convey the new realities.